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Sunday, July 1, 2012

The rights of men in college sports

Title-IX and reverse discrimination
By Perry Cook.
During World War II, 100,000 Asian-Americans, especially those of Japanese descent, were segregated from the general population and thrown into work camps, Relocation Centers, Assembly Centers, Citizen Isolation Camps, and Justice Department Internment Camps.
They were denied the agency which had been promised in the Constitution of the United States. They were held behind barbed wire and forced to work mostly as farm laborers. They were removed from their belongings and sent hundreds or even thousands of miles from their homes and some were never allowed to return. (Iritani, Frank and Joanne) Although they were eventually released, they had been discriminated against, in this case because of race, or the way they looked. Although the Japanese probably should have been reimbursed for their injuries, they never were. Recently, the U. S. Congress provided $1.2 billion for the progenitors of these prisoners, even if they were only 1/16th related to a former detainee. (University of Arizona Library, WRA Exhibit — Building the Relocation Camps.) That comes out to about $20,000 per person who was not discriminated against. This is known as reverse discrimination.
It is clearly unfair to those who are not discriminated against. Discrimination may be defined as, the unequal treatment of a group or individual based on their ethnicity, sex, religion, age, or disability, on the other hand, reverses discrimination harms those who are not discriminated as much or more as those who are discriminated against. Reverse discrimination in college sports is alive and well in America today. It is not that students of racial ethnicity are being given preferential treatment, rather the bias is gender based.
When America was founded it was based on equality. Since the year of America’s birth, there have been a number of different cases of people being discriminated against for their beliefs, race, or sex. Black slaves were first used on American soil in Jamestown in the early 1600’s. And even after the nation went to war to set them free more than two hundred years later, there was still segregation.
That was outlawed by various means in the 1950′s, 60′s, and 70’s. No African American has been rewarded with $20,000 because his ancestors were enslaved, raped, hanged, or held against his will with the full support of the laws of the United States.
The earlier definition of discrimination has been most commonly used throughout the mid-1900’s during the Civil Rights Movement when black Americans struggled to gain full citizenship rights and racial equality. In society today, the government has laws to protect groups and/or individuals from discrimination. Some of these laws are “the Civil Rights Act of 1954, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Fair Housing Act.” However, there is a danger in correcting discrimination. That danger may be over correction at the expense of the first party.
Women have also been discriminated against. It wasn’t until 1920 that women were allowed to vote. None have been awarded large sums of money because they were unable to enjoy all the rights promised in the Constitution. However, in the present today women are equal to men in almost every aspect of life. In fact, women enjoy a distinct advantage over men in college athletics. As has been the case with minority reverse discrimination, so it is now with reverse women discrimination in college sports.
Another group that has been discriminated against is male college athletes who have a realization of what is actually going on. Stephen Neal was a world champion wrestler and also captain of his wrestling team at California State University- Bakersfield (Hlinak, Supreme Court Considering Whether to Hear title IX Retaliation Case). This all suddenly stopped when the school cut the team. It was not an issue of money, or equipment, and obviously, if Neal was a world champion wrestler, it wasn’t an issue of ability. It was just a simple issue of the school having too many male athletes. It wasn’t even entirely the schools decision, more it was a federal law decision. Athletes all across America are being hurt by the prejudice of insane feminist.

Olympics and college suffer becasue of Title-IX

Some colleges have found that the easiest way to comply with Titie-IX is to cut mens sports programs

“We completely embrace Title IX, and in our opinion we are the ones who are defending Title IX.” The actual language of Title IX is such that it prohibits gender based discrimination on college campuses that receive federal funds” (Pyeatt, Title IX Discriminates Against Men’s Athletics, Suit Alleges).

Moyer pointed out Marquette University’s wrestling squad, which was cancelled because of a gender quota. The university had provided only minimal help to the athletes, as far as money. According to Moyer, the Marquette wrestling team was almost completely funded from private donations from alumni. Moyer did say however, that the school provided money for all utilities in the practice area. He also commented about the athletes on the wrestling team,
“They simply had too many male athletes in their athletic department. The only reason they were eliminated was because they were men, which clearly violates everything that Title IX is about.”
The NWLC filed their brief, and had many comments to make on the subject. The group felt that the NWCA was accusing women and suggested that they move their bull’s-eye away from women and more towards the school’s refusal to support both men and women’s teams.
They also suggested that the NWCA look to the schools to take money away from “the bloated” football and men’s basketball programs. This argument by the NWLC seems inaccurate because Moyer had previously stated that they supported women’s sports. The case was dismissed and appealed later by the NWCA; however, not much was accomplished in favor of them (Pyeatt, Title IX Discriminates Against Men’s Athletics, Suit Alleges).
Title IX is a quota system. It is based on the equal numbers of men and women in sports. It is often argued that Title IX is not a quota and leaves the decision of cutting a team or pulling funds away from a team, up to the school.
While Title IX does leave decisions up to the schools, it also creates an atmosphere where there is an obvious team that will go. Women’s sports are not cut. Men’s teams are often cut. The main reason for cutting the teams is because of numbers. There are too many males.
Looking at numbers of male athletes that have been cut, or looking at numbers of teams that have been cut, does not give a realization of what is actually going on. Stephen Neal was a world champion wrestler and also captain of his wrestling team at California State University- Bakersfield (Hlinak, Supreme Court Considering Whether to Hear title IX Retaliation Case). This all suddenly stopped when the school cut the team. It was not an issue of money, or equipment, and obviously, if Neal was a world champion wrestler, it wasn’t an issue of ability. It was just a simple issue of the school having too many male athletes. It wasn’t even entirely the schools decision, more it was a federal law decision. Athletes all across America are being hurt by the prejudice of insane feminist.
In the 2000 Olympics in Australia there was an interesting development that came to pass. For the first time since 1968, the USA freestyle wrestlers failed to win a single gold medal (Coulter, Title IX Defeats Male Athletes). This is an apparent connection between college wrestling teams being cut and the U.S. not performing as it has in the past. Is this really what America wanted, to give up the glory of winning in front of the world, for women to have a few more sports that are put to an end after college? There remain only three professional leagues for women, the WNBA (basketball), LPGA (golf), and tennis. There was a soccer league called WUSA, however, it failed to generate enough money in its third season and became extinct. It wasn’t that men put an end to the WUSA; it was that fans didn’t want to watch anymore. It is men’s sports that suffer through this, while more and more money gets drained into women’s sports that are not producing. The WNBA has lost money every year since it debuted. As of today, the league survives solely by the media support of the NBA.